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Integration Testing: IHost Lifecycle with NUnit

Starting yesterday, all of my content about automated testing is curated under the new Automated Testing page on this site.

I kicked off a new blog series yesterday with Integration Testing: IHost Lifecycle with xUnit.Net. I started by just discussing how to manage the lifecycle of a .Net IHost inside of an xUnit.Net testing library. I used xUnit.Net because I’m much more familiar with that library, but we mostly use NUnit for our testing at MedeAnalytics, so I’m going to see how the IHost lifecycle I discussed and demonstrated last time in xUnit.NEt could work in NUnit.

To catch you up from the previous post, I have two projects:

  1. An ASP.Net Core web service creatively named WebApplication. This web service has a small endpoint that allows you to post an array of numbers that returns a response telling you the sum and product of those numbers. The code for that controller action is shown in my previous post.
  2. A second testing project using NUnit that references WebApplication. The testing project is going to use Alba for integration testing at the HTTP layer.

With NUnit, I chose to use the SetupFixture construct to manage and share the IHost for the test suite like this:

    [SetUpFixture]
    public class Application
    {
        // Make this lazy so you don't build it out
        // when you don't need it.
        private static readonly Lazy<IAlbaHost> _host;

        static Application()
        {
            _host = new Lazy<IAlbaHost>(() => Program
                .CreateHostBuilder(Array.Empty<string>())
                .StartAlba());
        }

        public static IAlbaHost AlbaHost => _host.Value;

        // I want to expose the underlying Lamar container for some later
        // usage
        public static IContainer Container => (IContainer)_host.Value.Services;

        // Make sure that NUnit will shut down the AlbaHost when
        // all the projects are finished
        [OneTimeTearDown]
        public void Teardown()
        {
            if (_host.IsValueCreated)
            {
                _host.Value.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }

With the IHost instance managed by the Application static class above, I can consume the Alba host in an NUnit test like this:

    public class sample_integration_fixture
    {
        [Test]
        public async Task happy_path_arithmetic()
        {
            // Building the input body
            var input = new Numbers
            {
                Values = new[] {2, 3, 4}
            };

            var response = await Application.AlbaHost.Scenario(x =>
            {
                // Alba deals with Json serialization for us
                x.Post.Json(input).ToUrl("/math");
                
                // Enforce that the HTTP Status Code is 200 Ok
                x.StatusCodeShouldBeOk();
            });

            var output = response.ReadAsJson<Result>();
            output.Sum.ShouldBe(9);
            output.Product.ShouldBe(24);
        }
    }

And now a couple notes about what I did in Application:

  1. I think it’s important to create the IHost lazily, so that you don’t incur the cost of spinning up the IHost when you might be running other tests in your suite that don’t need the IHost. Rapid developer feedback is important, and that’s an awfully easy optimization that could pay off.
  2. The static Teardown() method is decorated with the `[OneTimeTearDown]` attribute to direct NUnit to call that method after all the tests are executed. I cannot stress enough how important it is to clean up resources in your test harness to ensure your ability to quickly iterate through subsequent test runs.
  3. NUnit has a very different model for parallelization than xUnit.Net, and it’s completely “opt in”, so I think there’s less to worry about on that front with NUnit.

At this point I don’t think I have a hard opinion about xUnit.Net vs. NUnit, and I certainly wouldn’t bother switching an existing project from one to the other (even though I’ve certainly done that plenty of times in the past). I haven’t thought this one through enough, but I still think that xUnit.Net is a little bit cleaner for unit testing, but NUnit might be better for integration testing because it gives you finer grained control over fixture lifecycle and has some built in support for test timeouts and retries. At one point I had high hopes for Fixie as another alternative, and that project has become active again, but it would have a long road to challenge either of the two now mainstream tools.

What’s Next?

This series is meant to support my colleagues at MedeAnalytics, so it’s driven by what we just happen to be talking about at any given point. Tomorrow I plan to put out a little post on some Lamar-specific tricks that are helpful in integration testing. Beyond that, I think dealing with database state is the most important thing we’re missing at work, so that needs to be a priority.


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